PS70FEB | Southgate Amateur Radio News

This page is brought to you by the Southgate Amateur Radio Club and The Communication Gateway Limited.

 

Page last updated on: Thursday, March 26, 2015

 

 

PS70FEB

PS70FEB is the 4th of 12 Special Event Station to celebrate 70 years of the end of World War II, and a tribute to the Brazilian Expeditionary Force – FEB, in the Italian Campaign.

Each month in 2015 we will activate a different callsign and also send 12 different QSLs.

PS70FEB

01_30.April.2015

SSB, CW & Digital

QSL Manager: PS7AB

QSL policy:  I will answer all QSL requested via direct (U$2,00), Bureau, eQSL or LOTW.

= SWL Cards are welcome =

More informations: http://www.qrz.com/db/ps70feb

73′

Rony Reis PS7AB

http://www.ps7ab.com.br

via PS70FEB | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

———————————————-

Thanks to Rony Reis (PS7AB) for this announcement commemorating the role of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force in Italy during World War II.  Here’s your chance to make some interesting contacts, collect some beautiful QSL cards, and learn more about the history of Brazil during World War II.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for dropping by today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Oklahoma Amateur Radio Volunteers Activate Net to Track Severe Weather

Oklahoma Amateur Radio Volunteers Activate Net to Track Severe Weather

TAGS: amateur radio, Amateur Radio SKYWARN, amateur radio stations, ARRL Oklahoma Section, Coordinator Mark Conklin, national weather service, Oklahoma City, oklahoma section, Oklahoma Section Emergency, radio emergency service, skywarn spotters, weather service office

03/27/2015

Amateur Radio SKYWARN volunteers in Oklahoma went on alert March 25 as severe thunderstorms sparked tornadoes. The Southwest Independent Repeater Association (SWIRA) and Tulsa Region SKYWARN nets were active in support of tornado warnings in both the Oklahoma City and Tulsa Metropolitan areas. No Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) activation was required, however.

“March 25 was a busy afternoon and evening in Oklahoma,” ARRL Oklahoma Section Manager Lloyd Colston, KC5FM, told ARRL.

Oklahoma Section Emergency Coordinator Mark Conklin, N7XYO, said that ARES-OK Tulsa Region was put on standby. “No communication support was requested by served agencies,” he said. “Other than some local cell service overload, normal communications were up and working.”

The WX5TUL Tulsa National Weather Service SKYWARN Net activated on VHF and UHF, with approximately 25 stations checking in. Weather spotters reported four tornadoes, two causing major damage and injury, along with large and frequent severe hail, minor street flooding and significant damage due to straight-line winds, causing widespread power outages. The severe weather has been blamed for at least one death.

Colston said the SWIRA net control stations received reports — at times under challenging conditions — that were relayed to the National Weather Service office in Norman. “Both the Tulsa and Norman offices have Amateur Radio stations,” he pointed out. “Both encourage SKYWARN and Weather Ready Nation initiatives in their service areas.”

Colston said that as the storm progressed across the Tulsa Metro area many of the early damage reports were passed to the Tulsa Area Emergency Management Agency via Amateur Radio. “Oklahoma Section radio amateurs reported on this storm system until it exited the state late that evening,” he said. Colston and Conklin noted that many early “ground truth” and tornado observations came from SKYWARN spotters.

Conklin said that the Tulsa Amateur Radio Club (TARC) UHF Superlink System is used for SKYWARN traffic outside the Tulsa Metro area, while TARC’s VHF repeater handles SKYWARN net traffic inside the Tulsa Metro area.

A preliminary damage assessment from the National Weather Service Office in Norman confirmed more than one tornado, the most severe being in Moore. The NWS survey rated damage from the tornado as “high-end EF1.” Widespread damage also resulted from winds of from 70 to 80 MPH, the NWS said.

“Situations like the one on March 25 are complicated,” the NWS commented on the Oklahoma City and Moore tornado and wind event, “and the storms that produced the damage are difficult to anticipate and extremely difficult to warn for. They are not uncommon in Oklahoma.” Tornadoes that occur in these situations “represent the lower end of the tornado intensity spectrum,” the NWS said.

 

via Oklahoma Amateur Radio Volunteers Activate Net to Track Severe Weather.

—————————————

Source:  http://www.arrl.org

Amateur Radio SKYWARN volunteers in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa metropolitan areas remain on alert, as four tornadoes touched down in these areas, with two of the violent storms causing damage, injury, at least one death, and an episode of intense hail.  Twenty – five ham operators are responding to calls and providing on-site data.  Our prayers go with you.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Hacking the Nazis: The secret story of the women who broke Hitler’s codes – Yahoo News

Hacking the Nazis: The secret story of the women who broke Hitler’s codes

By Nick Heath

March 26, 2015 12:11 PM



Of the 10,000-plus staff at the Government Code and Cypher School during World War II, two-thirds were female. Three veteran servicewomen explain what life was like as part of the code-breaking operation during World War II.

“I was given one sentence, ‘We are breaking German codes, end of story’.”

It was Ruth Bourne’s first job out of college, when, like thousands of other young British women during World War II, she was recruited to aid the Allied cipher-breaking efforts at Bletchley Park.

Today, the mansion in the heart of the southeast English countryside is famous for being where the brilliant mathematician Alan Turing cracked the Nazi’s Enigma code.

Because Turing’s individual achievements were so momentous, it’s sometimes forgotten that more than 10,000 other people worked at the Government Code and Cypher School, of whom more than two-thirds were female. These servicewomen played a pivotal role in an operation that decrypted millions of German messages and which is credited with significantly shortening the war.

The vital importance of preempting German plans led to a huge push to create machines that could crack ciphers at superhuman speeds. These efforts produced Colossus, the world’s first programmable electronic digital computer.

However, the reality of running these electromechanical machines, setting rotors and plugging boards day in day out, was often less than thrilling, with the 18-year-old Bourne envying the girls who test-piloted aircraft fresh off the production line.

“That was exciting but standing in front of a machine for eight hours was not,” she said.

 

.

 

 

.

As mundane as her daily routine was, it was vital in deciphering coded messages sent by the German army, navy and air force and helping the Allied forces turn the tide of war.

The problem facing Britain and its allies early in the war was that the Enigma machine used to encrypt Nazi military traffic could scramble a message in 158 million ways, and each day the settings used would be changed. On top of that, on an average day at Bletchley Park code-breakers were tasked with breaking between 2,000 and 6,000 messages of German, Italian, Japanese and Chinese origin. There were far too many to check by hand.

The code-breaking needed to be automated, and it fell to British mathematician and father of the computer Alan Turing, with the help of the British Tabulating Machine Company, to devise the machine for the job.

His solution was the bombe, an electromechanical machine designed to emulate the workings of 36 Enigmas.

Bourne was a member of the Women’s Royal Naval Service, known as the Wrens, who were charged with preparing the machines each day, turning the drums on the front and plugging up the boards at the back according to settings laid out in a menu. These settings were derived from cribs, which were best guesses at fragments of plain text–for example, standard openings such as weather reports–from the enciphered messages.

If correct, these cribs would reveal some of the Enigma settings used to encode the message and provide a starting point for devising the remaining settings. The bombe could check the possible ways the Enigma could have been set up incredibly rapidly, dismissing incorrect settings one at a time.

If the crib and initial settings were good, then the bombe could return the information needed to crack the code within minutes.

“I joined just around D-Day and at that time the traffic was tremendous. We were breaking thousands of messages,” Bourne said.

“We knew that every 24 hours the code was changed and that was why time and accuracy were of the absolute essence. You were really pressured.”

Like Bourne, many of the Navy Wrens operating the bombes were teenagers not long out of school, who found themselves working a punishing schedule, with very little margin for error.

Bourne said, “You didn’t have to be rocket scientists but what you had to be was 125 percent accurate. You worked in pairs and you and your checker would plug up the back of your machine, which was extremely complicated. You had to brush out the wires on your drums so there wouldn’t be short circuits, make sure the plugs at the back of the machine were pushed in and straight, and you had to be on the go for the eight-hour shift, as you you were standing for the whole time.”

There was little respite during a shift for the bombe operators, even during meal times.

“You had half an hour off for a meal,” said Bourne. “The bombes were in a building with high brick walls, barbed wire and sentries, you had to get out from there, run to your canteen, grab your meal and run back and then your checker, who’d been operating while you were away, could go and get her meal. It was very intense and very concentrated. We were young and learned quickly.”

via Hacking the Nazis: The secret story of the women who broke Hitler’s codes – Yahoo News

———————————————-

Sources:  http://www.eham.net/articles/34285.

http://wwwnews.yahoo.com/hacking-nazis-secret-story-women-161100322.html.

Fascinating account of the women code breakers at Britain’s Blectchley Park during World War II.  According to “Tech Republic” reporter Nick Heath, code breakers, such as Ruth Bourne, “played a pivotal role in an operation that decrypted millions of German messages and which is credited with significantly shortening the war.”  These are indeed some of the “unsung heroes” of the  conflict that killed millions more than 7 decades ago.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Amateur Radio Television Pioneer Don Miller, W9NTP, SK

Amateur Radio Television Pioneer Don Miller, W9NTP, SK

TAGS: Amateur Radio SSTV, Army Signal Corps, ARRL Life Member, Daily DX, Dayton Hamvention®, ham radio, New Mexico, Russian Mir space, World War

03/26/2015

Amateur Radio television Pioneer and past ARRL Central Division Director Don C. Miller, W9NTP, of Waldron, Indiana, died March 22. He was 91. An ARRL Life Member, he was licensed in 1943. In the 1960s Miller was instrumental in developing slow-scan TV (SSTV) for ham radio, working with Cop MacDonald, VY2CM, and others. Miller wrote several articles on SSTV for QST. In 1972, Dayton Hamvention® honored Miller as Amateur of the Year. Miller served as Central Divison Director from 1977 until 1980.

During World War II, Miller served in the US Army Signal Corps before being recruited to work at the Trinity atomic weapons test site in New Mexico as part of the Manhattan Project.

“I went to work one day and finally figured out that we were building a nuclear bomb. But that’s all I knew about it,” Miller told The Rushville Republican newspaper in 2007. Miller said he worked with J. Robert Oppenheimer, who oversaw the Manhattan Project.

Miller also was a collector of Native American and other historical artifacts, and in 2014, FBI agents raided his Indiana home and confiscated objects alleged to have been collected in violation of federal and state laws and of several treaties. Miller’s collection included artifacts from all over the world. He told investigators that he had began collecting as a youngster.

Miller held a PhD from Purdue University. After a stint as a researcher at Naval Avionics in Indianapolis, Miller and his wife, Sue, W9YL (SK), in 1984 founded Wyman Research Inc, which developed and marketed Amateur Radio SSTV and ATV equipment. Wyman Research engineered the SSTV gear used onboard the Russian Mir space station. — Thanks to The Shelbyville News; The Daily DX

 

via Amateur Radio Television Pioneer Don Miller, W9NTP, SK.

——————————————-

Source:  http://www.arrl.org

The Amateur Radio Community will miss the contributions and insights of Dr. Don Miller (PhD–Purdue University and W9NTP), who died on 22 March 2015.  He was 91 years old.  In the 1960s, Miller was a driving force behind the development of Slow-Scan Television (SSTV) for the Amateur Radio Service.  In World War II, Miller also worked with atomic scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer on the highly classified Manhattan Project.  He will be missed.

For the latest in Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

The ARRL Letter, March 26, 2015

The ARRL Letter, March 26, 2015.

——————————————————-

Please click link to read the full report.

Source:  http://www.forums.qrz.com.

Here’s the latest edition of The ARRL Letter, with a complete report of the top stories affecting the Amateur Radio Community.  The “Letter” also contains the K7RA propagation analysis by Tad Cook (K7RA), a list of upcoming conventions and hamfests, the latest DX news, and technical trends impacting Amateur Radio.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.  These feeds include ARRL news headlines, stories from the Southgate Amateur Radio Club, extracts from my antenna blog (http://kh6jrm.blogspot.com), featured stories from my Hawaii Science and Technology Digest blog, and the latest propagation programs.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

 

ARRL Centennial Points Challenge, W1AW WAS Awards Application Window Open

ARRL Centennial Points Challenge, W1AW WAS Awards Application Window Open

TAGS: amateur radio, ARRL Chief Operating, arrl headquarters, Centennial Points Challenge, Centennial QSO Party, Incoming QSL Service, Level Award, lotw, Norm Fusaro, Officer Harold Kramer, paper QSL cards, Points Challenge certificates, points-qualifying QSOs, qsl bureau, QSO Party participants, QSO Party web, Radiosport Department

03/25/2015

The window to apply for ARRL Centennial Points Challenge and W1AW Worked All States awards is now open! The ARRL Centennial operating events were hugely successful, with participation way beyond anyone’s expectations.

“This was the biggest on-the-air operation in the history of Amateur Radio,” ARRL Chief Operating Officer Harold Kramer, WJ1B, said. More than 5.5 million Centennial event contacts were recorded in Logbook of The World (LoTW) during 2014. That number includes contacts with W1AW portable operations as well as those with individual ARRL members and Field Organization volunteers. W100AW completed about 70,000 contacts.

For most applicants, the process will be simple and largely automated, explained Norm Fusaro, W3IZ, Assistant Manager, Field Services and Radiosport Department.

“The form will auto-populate, if we have your information on file, and the form can be edited to update name and address information only,” Fusaro said. “The system will select the awards for which you qualify. Certificates will be printed daily, so fulfillment will be ongoing, while plaques will be shipped directly from the supplier.” Fusaro said ARRL Headquarters has hired extra staff members to handle the added workload.

Certificates will be available for the Centennial Points Challenge Award, while W1AW WAS Award participants will have the option of a certificate or a plaque. Certificates are $16, and plaques are $60.

Fusaro said the task of checking and double-checking electronic logs, entering paper logs into LoTW, and resolving various anomalies put an unexpected burden on staff resources and delayed the opening of the awards window. ARRL Headquarters also had to recalculate all submitted scores to come up with final tallies.

“It’s been a very time and staff-intensive process, researching busted call signs and running down claimed contacts and mode discrepancies for operators,” Fusaro said.

Centennial Points Challenge logs must have been submitted through LoTW by January 22, but participants may apply for Centennial operating awards indefinitely. The system automatically looks for points-qualifying QSOs from submitted logs and applies them to each participant’s Centennial Points Challenge total. While most Centennial QSO Party participants entered their contact information into LoTW, operators do not have to use LoTW to apply for Points Challenge certificates or W1AW WAS awards.

Qualifying for the Top Level Award requires 15,000 points. The Third Level Award requires 7500 points, while the Second and First Level awards require 3000 and 1000 points, respectively. Point totals will be printed on certificates.

US stations that worked W1AW/p and W100AW during the Centennial may request QSL cards via the Incoming QSL Service on the Centennial QSO Party web page. This is a one-time only use of the QSL Bureau for this purpose, and those who want to receive cards via the Bureau should ensure that their accounts are sufficiently funded, because cards will not be held. Cards destined for stations outside the US will be sent via the QSL Bureau. Participants also may request cards directly, providing one SASE for up to six cards per envelope.

W1AW/p and W100AW will not confirm every contact on the traditional paper QSL cards, but will confirm QSOs for each mode and on most bands on a single card for each weekly operation.

via ARRL Centennial Points Challenge, W1AW WAS Awards Application Window Open.

———————————————-

Source:  http://www.arrl.org

Congratulations to all of you who participated in the ARRL Centennial Points Challenge and the W1AW Worked All States Contest.  The application window for those events is now open. You can contact Norm Fusaro (W3IZ), Assistant Manager, Field Services and Radiosport Department for details.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for being with us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

 

ARRLX – World Amateur Radio Day | Southgate Amateur Radio News

This page is brought to in association with The Southgate Amateur Radio Club and The Communication Gateway Limited.

 

 

Page last updated on: Wednesday, March 25, 2015

 

 

ARRLX – World Amateur Radio Day

Every year, on the 18th of April, radio amateurs from all over the world celebrate the World Amateur Radio Day.

This year, the ARRLx, Associação de Radioamadores da Região de Lisboa (Amateur Radio Association of the Lisbon Region) will be attending this event from the Castle of São Jorge in Lisbon.

We will be active from 09:00 to 19:00 local time, with our callsign: CS5LX/p, on HF, VHF, UHF, including an ATV station that will give images of what is happening in the Castle.

We invite all hams, in Lisbon and neighboring Counties, to visit us and share with us their experiences and put the callsign on the air.

On the same date also marks the International Day for Monuments and Sites.

More information can be found on our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/ARRLx/1426705204239438

 

Best 73’s from the ARRLx

Francisco Carmo – CR7AJM

via ARRLX – World Amateur Radio Day | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

——————————————————

Thanks to Francisco Carmo (CR7AJM) for this update for World Amateur Radio Day (18 April 2015).  Special event station CS5LX/p will be operating from the Castle of Sao Jorge in Lisbon, Portugal.  Here’s your chance to get a new contact, make some good friends, and learn something about the history and culture of Portugal…a “win-win” for everyone.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Successful transmissions of new DARC Radio and EARN on 49m SW band | Southgate Amateur Radio News

This page is brought to in association with The Southgate Amateur Radio Club.

Page last updated on: Tuesday, March 24, 2015

 

Successful transmissions of new DARC Radio and EARN on 49m SW band

Last weekend saw the successful launch of two new Amateur Radio related shows on the 49m broadcast band.

DARC Radio was transmitted at 1000 UTC on Sunday from a 100Kw transmitter in Austria, it was then repeated on Monday at 1600 UTC from the Amateur owned 10Kw AM transmitter of Channel292 on 6070 KHz from Ingolstadt, Bavaria, Germany.

The English Amateur Radio News (EARN) program preceeded the DARC Radio program on Monday at 1500UTC.

Reports have been received from around Europe (UK, Holland, Sweden, Germany, Austria) – all positive on both reception strength and content. We even had a long distance listener in Malaysia listening via an SDR in Holland.

Please note times will change when we change the clocks moving into Summer time, so please check the website channel292.de for the updated schedule for the next few weeks. We also plan to move EARN to after the repeat of the DARC Radio show on Mondays, so propagation may be better at that time for the show.

Email addresses for inquiries and reception reports are radio@darc.de for the DARC Radio program and EnglishARNews@gmail.com for EARN.

 

73 Ed DD5LP

via Successful transmissions of new DARC Radio and EARN on 49m SW band | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

————————————————

Apparently, the DARC purchase of a former commercial short wave station in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, Germany (channel 292 at 6.072 MHz) by the DARC has proven to be a successful venture.  Reception reports from the 10 KW station have been gratifying, with excellent audio being reported throughout Europe.  DARC also uses a 100 KW shortwave station transmitting from Austria.  If you have the resources, this is an excellent way to spread the message of Amateur Radio.  Perhaps the DARC could also consider buying bandwidth on the Internet and streaming some of these broadcasts.  Many commercial broadcast stations in the United States (including the one I called “home” for 36 years) are using streaming technology via the Internet to extend their coverage and market reach.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Can you read me? Boy Scouts send a message with a new merit badge. – The Washington Post

One Boy Scout is sending a message by a signaling method called wig-wag and another is taking the reply in this photo from 1956. (Harry Goodwin/The Washington Post)

By John Kelly Columnist March 23

Eventually, everything comes back. Young men are wearing beards again, just as they did in Victorian times. Vinyl albums — thought to have been killed by CDs and MP3s — are so trendy that record-pressing plants are working round-the-clock to satisfy hungry hipsters. Coffee used to be bad for you. Now it’s touted for its miracle properties.

I wouldn’t be surprised if doctors start promoting cigarettes for “lung health.”

John Kelly writes “John Kelly’s Washington,” a daily look at Washington’s less-famous side. Born in Washington, John started at The Post in 1989 as deputy editor in the Weekend section. View Archive

Facebook

The latest golden oldie to make a comeback is the semaphore. The signaling system that employs flags to spell out letters is part of the Boy Scouts’ new “Signs, Signals and Codes” merit badge. So’s another seemingly obsolete communications method: Morse code.

The merit badge was released this month.

“It’s almost sort of a throwback, to reintroduce kids to skills which maybe someday they’ll need when their batteries run out on their phones,” said Steve Bowen, chairman of the Boy Scouts of America’s merit badge development committee.

I think Steve is joking about the phones, but the merit badge isn’t totally focused on outmoded forms of communication. Scouts are required to be familiar with American Sign Language and Braille. Cryptography is an aspect, too.

And then there’s something that should come easily to any teenager: emojis and emoticons. The merit badge’s requirements include: “Discuss text-message symbols and why they are commonly used. Give examples of your favorite 10 text symbols or emoticons.”

I’m partial to the Easter Island head, myself.

“This merit badge is cross-generational,” said Steve, a 68-year-old retired Montana veterinarian (and Eagle Scout). “I think kids will learn a lot from the adults and the adults will learn a lot from the kids.”

Earlier Boy Scout merit badges required intimate knowledge of semaphore and Morse code. In 1938, scouts had to be able to send and receive semaphore messages at the rate of at least 48 letters a minute and Morse code at not fewer than 24 letters a minute.

To earn today’s badge, scouts have to send a message of six to 10 words, and apparently there’s no time limit.

“We’re not really pushing proficiency as much as an exploration, a reawakening that all of these things exist,” Steve said.

Boy Scouts who earn the signaling badge will have something up on new ham radio operators, who are no longer required by the Federal Communications Commission to know Morse code.

I suspect it may have been wounded national pride that got the Boy Scouts to reintroduce these antique signaling methods. Steve said that a few years ago, there was an international gathering of Scouts in Southern California. One of the competitions was semaphore.

“Our kids, they just struggled, while the Mexican girls could whip it off like eating popcorn,” Steve said. “They were incredible.”

U.S. Boy Scouts beaten by Mexican Girl Scouts. It sounds like a scene from a movie co-directed by Wes Anderson and Robert Rodriguez.

Steve said the Boy Scouts are continually tweaking the merit badge selection. “Kids are one of our biggest sources of ideas,” he said. One Scout has been pushing for a paleontological microbiology badge.

“Bugs that are found in amber, that kind of thing,” Steve explained. Alas, it’s a little too narrow. “It’s a subset of a subset of a subset.”

One recent addition is chess, introduced in 2011.

“I expected it to be accepted okay, but it really shot off the chart,” Steve said. “I didn’t imagine our kids would be so interested. It shot up to the top 20 merit badges earned in its first year.”

What did I tell you: Everything old is new again.

via Can you read me? Boy Scouts send a message with a new merit badge. – The Washington Post.

———————————————-

Source:  The Washington Post, 23 March 2015.

http://www.eham.net.

An amusing article by “Washington Post” reporter John Kelly.  It seems the future is becoming the past, as far as Boy Scout Merit Badges go.  The new “Signs, Signals and Codes” merit badge adopted by the Boy Scouts of America reminds me of an earlier age, where knowledge of either  Morse Code, “wigwag”, and semaphore was required to advance in the scouting ranks.  According to reporter Kelly, the move to reinstate some form of code as an optional merit badge requirement was preceded by the accomplishments of a Mexican girl scout unit, which outperformed some U.S. Boy Scouts in a semaphore competition.  Ah, it’s “Back To The Future.”

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

 

S8 E6 of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast – Making released.

S8 E6 of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast – Making released.

Series Eight EpisodeSix of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast – Making PCB’s has beenreleased.

In this episode,Martin M1MRB / W9ICQ is joined by Ed Durrant DD5LP and MartinRothwell M0SGL to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. ColinM6BOY rounds up the news in brief, and this episodes feature is -Making PCB’s by Matthew Nassau 2E0MTT

Newsstories include:-

Amateur / Ham Radio Statistics – March 2015

Winner of UK CanSat 2015 Announced

Scientist Radio Ham Named for Prestigious Award

World Amateur Radio Day 2015

80th ARRL Anniversary of North Dakota Radio Amateur

PyQSO v0.2 Released

Amateur Radio Parity Act of 2015 Introduced in Congress

SARL Assist Zambians with the Licensing of Amateurs

TheICQPODCAST can be downloaded from http://www.icqpodcast.com

via S8 E6 of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast – Making released..

———————————-

Another great effort from Martin (M1MRB), Ed (DD5LP), Martin (M0SGL), and Colin (M6BOY.  In addition to a review of Amateur Radio News, The ICQ team presents a special feature about “Making PCBs” with Matthew Nassau (2E0MTT).  Enjoyable, informative program.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.