Eastern Seaboard ARES, SKYWARN Volunteers Prepare for Potentially Historic Storm

Volunteers Prepare for Potentially Historic Storm

TAGS: american red cross, ARES District Emergency, ARES Section Emergency, ares units, ARES volunteers, Eastern New York, eastern pennsylvania, Eastern Pennsylvania Section, New York, New York City, New York Section, radio emergency service, Section Manager

01/26/2015

[Updated 2015-01-26 @ 2005 UTC] Snowfall that started early this morning in the Mid-Atlantic States was just the first hint of what weather forecasters are calling a potentially historic and dangerous winter storm that is predicted to affect the entire Eastern Seaboard of the US. In addition, the gathering storm carries the threat of high winds, blowing and drifting snow, “whiteout conditions,” and possible — perhaps likely — power outages. A state of emergency has been declared in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and Connecticut Gov Dan Malloy ordered a statewide travel ban effective at 9 PM on Monday, January 26. ARRL Headquarters will be closed on Tuesday, January 27. Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) organizations in states that could experience blizzard conditions later today and into January 27 are already gearing up.

Eastern Pennsylvania Section Manager Joe Ames, W3JY, reported that the Eastern Pennsylvania Phone and Traffic Net has been put on standby/watch mode on 3917 kHz. “We anticipate no particular activation in Eastern Pennsylvania,” he said, “but if it’s as bad as predicted, we’ll assist however we can.” Snow has already begun falling in Eastern Pennsylvania.

New York City/Long Island Section Manager Jim Mezey, W2KFV, said, ARES teams in his Section “are ramping up to assist, if necessary.” He said the American Red Cross has indicated it may open three shelters on Long Island, but local emergency managers have not yet requested any ARES support.

Eastern New York SEC David Galletly, KM2O, has raised the readiness of all county groups in his Section for possible deployment in the storm’s aftermath. He notes that all New York Southern District counties — except Sullivan County — are under a blizzard warning, with the remainder of his Section under a winter storm warning. He said ARES units in the Southern District counties are on standby for possible American Red Cross shelter communication support duty. Galletly said snow has started to fall in the southern area of his Section at a rate of 2 to 3 inches per hour. Orange County was planning to activate its emergency operations center (EOC) today.

Galletly said that while the lightweight snow may drift more easily, it would be less likely to bring down power lines. “Look for possible closures of I-84 and I-87, south of Exit 17,” he said. “SKYWARN reportable conditions include snow totals, drifting, road closures, etc.”

“All group members should take steps now to secure their own and their families’ safety,” Galletly advised. “Please prepare alternate power and heat sources and charge all batteries. Monitor NWS and news sources for the progress of this storm.” He noted that the monthly Eastern New York Section ARES/RACES HF Net was still scheduled for Tuesday evening at 7:30 PM on 3993 kHz, “subject to change as conditions warrant,” and will be turned into a storm net if necessary.

Connecticut ARES Section Emergency Coordinator Wayne Gronlund, N1CLV, said a blizzard warning is in effect for the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut), and snowfall totals could exceed 2 feet. Gronlund has raised the Connecticut ARES activation status to Level 2 (standby, but ready to deploy) and asked his volunteers to continue assisting partner agencies, should the need arise. Gronlund emphasized that ARES volunteers should not deploy without direction from the appropriate ARES or local official.

“Above all, stay safe!” he added.

Connecticut Section Manager Betsey Doane, K1EIC, said all ARES District Emergency Coordinators have been asked to let Red Cross offices in their areas know that ARES is available, if needed. “Red Cross shelters lately are opening after the storm settles, unless otherwise needed,” she said. “The usual activities are going on, with batteries being charged and go kits ready.”

Doane said the Connecticut Digital Mobile Radio network was up and running, with ARES officials monitoring, and the state EOC is tied in with the Connecticut ARES network.

In Maine, store traffic has been brisk in coastal areas as residents stock up on necessary food, fuel, and supplies as well as generators, additional batteries, and auxiliary heaters, in case of a power outage. Maine SEC Phil Duggan, N1EP, has placed Maine ARES on a Yellow Alert (Level 1), due to the approaching storm, which is forecast to reach the state sometime after midnight. In a Yellow Alert, ARES/RACES members are advised that they may be called up and should monitor available ARES nets and public safety radios as well as weather radios and broadcast radio and TV to stay current with the situation. Duggan said the NWS office in Caribou — in Maine’s northernmost tier — has requested that he call up some Maine ARES weather and SKYWARN nets on 75 meters to collect ground-level weather information during and after the storm for relay to the NWS offices in Caribou and Gray, Maine.

The approaching storm has caused airlines to cancel some 5000 flights so far. Schools have called for early dismissal in parts of New Jersey. New York anticipated closing the New York Thruway and the Long Island Expressway. The entire New York City subway system may be shut down by this evening.

via Eastern Seaboard ARES, SKYWARN Volunteers Prepare for Potentially Historic Storm.

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Weather forecasters say this winter storm will be nasty.  Heavy snows, freezing rain, and gusty winds are expected to strike along the eastern seaboard of the United States, beginning now.  ARES/RACES teams are standing by to render communications support.  Stay safe!

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

ARRL Headquarters closed Tuesday, January 27, 2015 due to severe weather.

ARRL Headquarters closed Tuesday, January 27, 2015 due to severe weather.

ARRL offices will be closed tomorrow (Tuesday, January 27, 2015) due to a blizzard warning for much of Connecticut this afternoon and tomorrow. We will evaluate conditions on Wednesday morning and will be open if possible. Watch our Facebook page and on arrl.org for the latest info.

https://www.facebook.com/ARRL.org?fref=nf

http://www.arrl.org/home

73 K2HAT

73 K2HAT Lee Hatfield

http://www.qrz.com/db/K2HAT I use LOTW.

via ARRL Headquarters closed Tuesday, January 27, 2015 due to severe weather..

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Thanks to http://www.qrz.com, K2HAT, and ARRL Hq for this advisory.  The approaching storm is being called one of the biggest winter storms of all time.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please visit the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

W2LJ’s Blog – QRP – Do More With Less.: Don’t be an alligator!

Monday, January 26, 2015

Don’t be an alligator!

Listening to the local Skywarn repeater, one thing is striking me.

When you check into any kind of emergency net, whether it be Skywarn or anything else ….. don’t get chatty. Make your report or make your communications. Net Control does not need your life story.

Get in, say what you have to, and then make way for other reports.

I cannot believe some of the inane chit chat that I am hearing.

72 de Larry W2LJ

QRP – When you care to send the very least!

Posted by Larry Makoski at 4:22 PM

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Labels: emcomm, social media, weather

via W2LJ’s Blog – QRP – Do More With Less.: Don’t be an alligator!.

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Some excellent advice from Larry Makoski (W2LJ) concerning net behavior and courtesy.  Keep it short, simple, and to-the-point.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

50th Anniverary of Singapore

50th Anniverary of Singapore

Dear All:

This is to announce a special call sign to commemorate 50th anniversary of Singapore. On this occasion two different prefixes are given. One is 9V50 and another one is S61. After the prefix each 9V1 station’s

suffix follows. In my case S61KK since my original callsign is 9V1KK. This special callsign is valid through December 31, 2015. Please join us to celebrate this special occasion. S61 prefix has been given to only three stations. I look forward to seeing all of you soon.

Koichi

S61KK/9V1KK

via 50th Anniversary of Singapore.

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This could be an interesting year for amateur radio operators living in Singapore.  Hams in that country are celebrating the 50th anniversary of their city-state.  Special call signs and prefixes have been issued to commemorate the event.  There could be some large pileups as the year progresses.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar. These news feeds are updated frequently.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Cruise ship IRLP expedition

Cruise ship IRLP expedition

 

A group from the Australian Ladies Amateur Radio Association (ALARA) and friends will operate ‘marine mobile’ from the MS Celebrity Solstice, relying on lower power and the Internet Repeater Linking Project (IRLP) for communication.

A number of well-known radio amateurs, led by ALARA National President Jean Fisher VK3VIP, will be active from January 27 through to 11 February.

The MS Celebrity Solstice is one of the largest cruise liners to operate in Australian waters. The voyage begins at Sydney Circular Quay, down to Hobart for two days, then across to New Zealand using IRLP enabled repeaters along the way.

The ALARA group will leave the ship in Auckland, to be heard on the ZL1BQ device primarily (Node 6950) and various nodes in the ‘Waikato Network’.

VK Foundation Licence holders have always been allowed to operate as visitors in New Zealand.

After visiting friends, the group heads back to Melbourne by aircraft on February 11. A reverse direction trip by sea (Hobart – Sydney) last year showed how IRLP can be a fantastic and reliable communication method.

The ALARA group that at least includes Jean VK3VIP, Donna VK3FRET, Pat VK3OZ and Margaret VK3FMAB, may pop-up on some IRLP enabled repeaters in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand.

ALARA is unashamedly trying to promote IRLP to all who have modern analogue frequency modulated 2m and 70cm transceivers.

Your nearest IRLP enabled device is on a list at:

http://www.irlp.net/statuspdf.html

Jim Linton VK3PC

via Cruise ship IRLP expedition.

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Thanks to Jim Linton (VK3PC) for this somewhat unusual Cruise Ship IRLP DXpedition.  The event will run between 27 January 2015 and 11 February 2015 using the “ZL1BQ device” (node 6950).  Other nodes in the “Waikato Network” will also be used.

This sounds like a lot of fun.  Good luck to the Australian Ladies Amateur Radio Association!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for being with us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

ICQPODCAST – Amateur Radio Grid Locators has been released

ICQPODCAST – Amateur Radio Grid Locators has been released

Series Eight Episode Two of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast – Amateur Radio Grid Locators has been released.

In this episode, Ed Durrant DD5LP, Martin Rothwell M0SGL and Matthew Nassau 2E0MTT to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin M6BOY rounds up the news in brief, and this episodes feature Amateur Radio Grid Locators.

News stories include:-

New Wireless Charging Organisation

Ofcom Error on English Callsigns

New D-STAR Support Section

The ARRL Library goes live!

More 5 MHz Channelsfor Czech amateurs

FCC EnforcementAgainst Marriott International

CQ DX Hall of FamerBob Schenck, N2OO, named CQ DX Editor

New World RecordClaimed on 10 GHz

Antarctic ActivityWeek

Michigan Passes,Governor Signs Antenna Accommodation Legislation

TheICQPODCAST can be downloaded from http://www.icqpodcast.com

via ICQPODCAST – Amateur Radio Grid Locators has been released.

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Another great program from Ed (DD5LP), Martin (M0SGL), and Matthew (2E0MTT).  This program reviews the top Amateur Radio news, as well as providing a detailed look at Amateur Radio Grid Locators.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently,

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

New PS-31 pico balloon from VK | Southgate Amateur Radio News

New PS-31 pico balloon from VK | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Early Saturday morning, 24 January 2015, Andy Nguyen (VK3YT), launched another of his now famous solar-powered pico balloons carrying small amateur radio transmitters.  This balloon, dubbed pico 31, uses at 20 mW transmitter operating  in JT9 and WSPR mode on 20 and 30 meters (14.095600 MHz/10.138700 MHz).  The balloon was last seen headed for South America.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Marijuana grow-lights cause problems for ham-radio operators

Marijuana grow-lights cause problems for ham-radio operators

Marijuana grow-lights cause problems for ham-radio operators

The marijuana industry and Uncle Sam haven’t been on the same page for 80 years, but these days, in a unique bit of weirdness, it’s not the U.S. Department of Justice that could create a problem for pot growers: It’s the Federal Communications Commission.

The FCC regulates the country’s electronic communications, which is relevant because it turns out that, bizarrely, light ballasts used in the growing of cannabis emit radio-frequency interference that screws up amateur-radio transmissions being sent by local ham operators, a licensed, legally protected practice.

In a March 12 letter to the commission, the American Radio Relay League, the national association for amateur radio, complained that interference from grow lights was greatest in the medium- and high-frequency bands between 1.8 and 30 megahertz, and that it comes in no small amount.

“The level of conducted emissions from this [Lumatek LK1000 grow light] is so high that, as a practical matter, one RF ballast operated in a residential environment would create preclusive interference to Amateur radio HF communications throughout entire neighborhoods,” wrote general counsel Christopher Imlay to acting chief of the FCC Spectrum Enforcement Division John Poutasse in the hopes the agency would halt sales.

Read the full Colorado Springs Independent article

http://www.csindy.com/coloradospring…nt?oid=2893921

via Marijuana grow-lights cause problems for ham-radio operators.

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Where the Department of Justice has failed to control indoor marijuana growers, the FCC might succeed.  It seems the grow light ballast transformers emit a huge amount of rfi–interference that hampers communication and , thereby, is of interest to the FCC.  Lately, the FCC has levied heavy fines for people deliberately causing rfi to a variety of communications systems, including amateur radio.  Perhaps a few hefty fines, destroyed equipment, and public ridicule might get the attention of these growers.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated daily.

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Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

VE70DAY

VE70DAY.

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The Penticton Amateur Radio Club will commemorate the 70th anniversary of VE Day with a special event station operating under the call sign of VE70DAY.  The station will be on the air from 01 May through 30 May 2015.  Contacts will be made on amateur radio bands from 80 to 10 meters.  A special certificate will be issued for contacts with the station.  For details, visit va7dp@shaw.ca.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Many antennas, multiple benefits

Many antennas, multiple benefits.

http://www.phys.org.

Jan 21, 2015

By combining large distributions of compact antenna nodes with fast fiber optic communication, researchers have developed a new wireless infrastructure ready for intense future demands. Credit: A*STAR Institute for Infocomm Research

A concept that balances large-scale installations of low-cost and low-power antennas to boost cellular coverage in difficult environments will also provide better connectivity to more users. Developed by A*STAR, this new architecture for wireless communications can help service providers meet growing demands for increased network capacity and improved energy efficiency.

Jingon Joung, Yeow Chia and Sumei Sun from the A*STAR Institute for Infocomm Research in Singapore sought to combine two state-of-the-art wireless technologies into a novel type of antenna system. The first technology, known as large-scale multiple-input multiple-output (L-MIMO), uses numerous ‘co-located’ antennas to significantly reduce relative noise levels inside devices. The second, called distributed-antenna systems (DAS), replaces conventional high-power antennas with strategically placed compact nodes that can split up and transmit signals more efficiently due to improved line-of-sight pathways.

The team’s strategy, known as large-scale distributed-antenna systems (L-DAS), seeks to implement DAS with a massive installation base, as seen with MIMO antennas (see image). To realize this goal, however, required a way to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with this innovative infrastructure—simply increasing the number of antenna nodes does not automatically improve wireless network efficiency.

Using a complex computer simulator, the researchers quantified the performances of multi-user L-DAS networks by evaluating their energy efficiencies (that is, the number of bits decoded per joule). According to Joung, modeling energy efficiency is challenging because L-DAS antennas communicate in two ways—wirelessly or through fiber-optic cables—and each channel has different and often proprietary power requirements.

“Another challenge is implementing real-world parameters in the L-DAS network simulator,” says Joung. “Many of these parameters have a large dynamic range, from a few quadrillionths of a watt to tens of watts, which can cause precision issues with the computer simulation.”

At first glance, the original ‘naive’ L-DAS setup seemed to have a greater energy consumption than the L-MIMO system with co-located antennas. However, the team identified four key attributes that could dramatically enhance the L-DAS energy efficiency: proper antenna selection, clustering of antennas, pre-coding to improve channel quality, and computerized power control. With these improvements, the L-DAS network outperformed both L-MIMO and DAS technologies.

The group is now looking to the future. “Heterogeneous network (HetNet) architectures that can seamlessly support different 2G, 3G, 4G or WLAN networks are strong candidates for future communication networks,” says Joung. “Because L-DAS architecture can be applied to many HetNet applications, this work can help ensure a gentle and smooth replacement of real-life networks with HetNet.”

via Many antennas, multiple benefits.

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Excellent antenna article from http://www.phys.org.

Large-scale distributed antenna systems (L-DAS) will help smooth the way to the new 5G mobile broadband platform.  Some of this technology may be applicable to Amateur Radio repeaters above 902 MHz.  We should take notice of these developments, because rf spectrum in the 2 GHz and 5 GHz bands are being “refarmed” from military, amateur radio, and public service agencies to commercial firms and cellular phone companies developing 5G services.  This trend is already underway in the UK, and, we in the United States should expect similar moves against bands we share with other users.  I expect some of our shared frequencies in the 2 GHz and 5 GHz bands will be withdrawn for these broadband services.  As the old saying goes, “Money talks.”  I don’t think Amateur Radio will prevail when so much money and equipment investment are involved in rolling out these new 5G mobile broadband services.  I hope I’m wrong in this assessment.  Meanwhile, “use it or lose it” applies here.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

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Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).