Amateur Radio Operators Prepare For The Megaquake . News | OPB

In the last 100 years, there have only been five magnitude 9.0 or higher “megaquakes” worldwide. The pressure currently building in the Cascadia Subduction Zone that runs along the California, Oregon, and Washington coasts could unleash a sixth.

To prepare for the disaster, this Saturday the Oregon Office of Emergency Management is supporting the largest statewide emergency communications exercise Oregon has ever had. About 200 amateur radio operators will participate, and according to Cory Grogan, a public information officer at OEM, these operators could serve a vital role in affected areas when – not if – the earthquake strikes.

“Basically any form of communication likely will be down,” Grogan said. “Amateur radio is going to be the only form of communication that we’ll have available at that point.”

Vince Van Der Hyde is one of those amateur radio operators. OPB All Things Considered host Kate Davidson decided to call him up to talk about how he plans to help when disaster strikes. The following responses have been edited for clarity.

Kate Davidson: How long have you been into HAM Radio?

Vince Van Der Hyde: I’ve been an amateur radio operator since 1959, at the age of 17. Even before that, in the early ‘50s we had the first Sputnik come up, and I listened to that as it beeped, beeped its way in orbit. That really struck my fascination.

KD: Do you have a station set up at home?

VDH: Oh yes, I have a station. I live off of Salem a little ways. I found a place with a nice hill. My sons helped me put up a 70-foot radio tower with currently 12 or 15 antennas.

KD: If a major earthquake and tsunami hit, what would happen step-by-step with these amateur radio operators?  What would they do?

VDH: As soon as the ground stops shaking, they would gather and report at the county emergency operations center for assignment to different kinds of tasks. Some of those tasks are to communicate from the county government to the state government, some of them are to support organizations like the Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

You have to look at what damage assessment has taken place, what condition roads and bridges are in, what kind of rescue operations, who needs gasoline, who needs water, where are people sheltered. All that information has to come into the state government.

KD: How important is it to have shortwave radio operators available to mobilize in an event like this?

VDH: Let me put it like this: One of the conditions of having an amateur radio license, which we’re granted by the Federal Communications Commission, is that we have an obligation as a holder of those licenses to provide emergency communications to the citizens. So, it’s really a tradition in the amateur radio field to help in anyway that we can with those kinds of communications.

via Amateur Radio Operators Prepare For The Megaquake . News | OPB.

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Sources:  http://www.opb.org/http://www.eham.net/articles/34465.

Today, Saturday (25 April 2015), the Oregon Office of Emergency Management conducted one of the largest earthquake drills in recent memory.  Oregon, like much of the Northwestern part of the United States, is prone to severe earthquakes every century–some measuring as high as 9.0 on the Richter Scale.  Oregon officials said approximately 200 amateur radio operators took part in today’s emergency communications exercise.  Cory Graoga, the PIO at OEM, added that these radio operators “could serve a vital role in affected areas when–not if–the earthquake strikes…”  Amateur Radio “could be the only form of communications we’ll have at that point.”  A good, positive article about the capabilities of amateur radio operators.  Hopefully, other emergency agencies throughout the country will heed Oregon’s warning and incorporate Amateur Radio into their emergency plans.

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Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM)

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #17 de K7RA:

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #17 de K7RA:

from W1AW Bulletin via the ARRL on April 24, 2015.

Website: http://www.arrl.org/

Add a comment about this article!

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #17 de K7RA:

ZCZC AP17

QST de W1AW

Propagation Forecast Bulletin 17 ARLP017

>From Tad Cook, K7RA

Seattle, WA April 24, 2015

To all radio amateurs

SB PROP ARL ARLP017

ARLP017 Propagation de K7RA

Solar activity perked up this week, with average daily sunspot numbers rising from 65.6 in the previous seven days to 120.9 in the April 16-22 period.

Average daily solar flux increased from 132.5 to 150.4 over the same period.

The day with the most geomagnetic activity was April 16, when the mid-latitude A index was 28, planetary A index was 43, and the high latitude college A index in Alaska was 57. These are high numbers!

Predicted solar flux for the near term is 135 and 130 on April 24-25, 125 on April 26 through May 1, 130 on May 2-5, 135 and 140 on May 6-7, 145 on May 8-9, 140 on May 10, 135 on May 11-16 and then a jump to 150 on May 17-18 before declining to 125 on May 23.

Predicted planetary A index is 8 and 12 on April 24-25, 8 on April 26-27, 10 on April 28, 8 on April 29 through May 2, 5 on May 3-5, 8 on May 6-8, 5 on May 9-11, then 8, 15, 20, 12, 8 and 12 on May 12-17, and 5 on May 18-19.

>From April 16-22 there was one new sunspot region appearing each day, except for April 21 when there were two.

If you check the solar flux prediction archive at http://www.filedropper.com/filemanager/public.php?service=files&t=326dd41340bab1066cf91d13df36b8fd (click on “Download This File”) you can see how dramatically the prediction for the next few days changed recently. The forecasters pulled back on their estimates for higher solar flux.

F.K. Janda, OK1HH sent his weekly geomagnetic prediction, and he sees quiet to active conditions April 24, active to disturbed April 25, quiet on April 26, quiet to active April 27, quiet to unsettled April 28, disturbed April 29, active to disturbed April 30 through May 1, quiet to active May 2, mostly quiet May 3-6, active to disturbed May 7-8, quiet to active May 9, mostly quiet May 10, quiet on May 11, active to disturbed May 12, disturbed May 13-14, quiet to active May 15, quiet to active May 16-18, and mostly quiet May 19-20.

OK1HH says that increases in solar wind are mostly unpredictable, but he expects increases on April 24, May 3-5, May 15-18, and May 20.

On Sunday, April 19 Jeff Hartley, N8II of Shepherdstown, West Virginia wrote: “The high solar wind essentially closed 15M and up for a couple of days late last week except for SA, back to near normal now. I easily worked HS0ZCW on 12M SSB today at 1517Z and a few loud southern EU. 10 never really opened to EU, but EA8DAZ was S9+20 dB.”

On April 23, Jon Jones, N0JK of Kansas wrote: “10 meters was good to the South Pacific the afternoon of April 23. FW5JJ was quite loud to the Midwest USA around 2200z on 28.029 MHz. I worked him with 50 watts while parked from my mobile. K index was 0.

“Last Saturday April 18 there was strong early season sporadic-E on 6 meters. I worked W7GJ MT and KE8FD UT around 2145z on 50 MHz via Es. K7TNT WY had a ‘pipeline’ to CE2AWW for 2 hours. No copy on CE2AWW in KS. I had to work Saturday night shift, but saw many people spotted FK8CP via Es link to TEP that evening.”

Thanks, Jon.

I believe his 10 meter mobile antenna is one of those shortened CB whips on the roof of his car.

Archives of the NOAA/USAF daily 45 day forecast for solar flux and planetary A index are at http://www.filedropper.com/filemanager/public.php?service=files&t=326dd41340bab1066cf91d13df36b8fd and http://www.filedropper.com/filemanager/public.php?service=files&t=be2a0a69fb6392907dc3d9a017dcace1 . Click on “Download this file” to download the archive and view in spreadsheet format.

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers, email the author at, k7ra@arrl.net.

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL Technical Information Service web page at http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of the numbers used in this bulletin, see http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere. An archive of past propagation bulletins is at http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Sunspot numbers for April 16 through 22 were 85, 93, 114, 142, 125, 153, and 134, with a mean of 120.9. 10.7 cm flux was 150.2, 149.6, 147.6, 151.7, 149.6, 153.8, and 150.3, with a mean of 150.4. Estimated planetary A indices were 43, 25, 13, 9, 10, 22, and 11, with a mean of 19. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 28, 20, 10, 9, 9, 18, and 9, with a mean of 14.7.

NNNN

/EX

Source: W1AW Bulletin via the ARRL.

via Propagation Forecast Bulletin #17 de K7RA:.

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Source:  W1AW Bulletin/http://www.arrl.org

Thanks to propagation expert Tad Cook (K7RA) for this HF propagation report.  Cook says solar activity picked up a bit over the previous report, with the average solar flux increasing from 132.5 to 150.4.   Sunspot numbers rose from 65.6 to 120.9 for the current reporting period (16-22 April 2015).  Tad also provides links to several space weather sights to further your understanding of the current HF propagation forecast.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

New QSO Radio Show & Podcasts

New QSO Radio Show & Podcasts.

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Please click link to view entire article.

Source:  http://www.forums.qrz.com

 

This week, the new “QSO Radio Show” hosted by Ted Randell featured special guest Jack Roland (KE0VH), who developed the SBE IRLP HAMNet.  The original program was broadcast over WTWW shortwave today (Saturday, 25 April 2015).  You can dowload the program podcast from http://tedrandell.com/pages/podcasts.php.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Dave Raycroft’s ICPO Bulletin | Southgate Amateur Radio News

Dave Raycroft’s ICPO Bulletin | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Please click on link to read the complete report.

Source:  The Southgate Amateur Radio Club/AMSAT-UK.

For DX hunters, Dave Raycroft’s (VA3RJ) ICPO Bulletin is a basic source of exotic locations, DXpeditions, and general band conditions.  This report covers the period 29 April through 01 May 2015.  Some of the interesting places mentioned in the report are:

Malta (9H3OO); Redang Island (9M2/R6AF/p); and Tintamarre Island (FS5PL).

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events,  please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are update frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

The K7RA Solar Update

The K7RA Solar Update

TAGS: active conditions, ARRL Technical Information, cm flux, daily solar flux, daily sunspot numbers, F.K. Janda, geomagnetic activity, high latitude college, high numbers, High solar wind, Higher solar flux, meter ssb, mid-latitude A index, mid-latitude A indices, monthly propagation charts, new sunspot region, past propagation bulletins, radio propagation, solar activity, solar flux, solar flux prediction, South America, West Virginia

04/24/2015

Solar activity perked up this week, with average daily sunspot numbers rising from 65.6 in the previous seven days to 120.9 in the April 16-22 period.

Average daily solar flux increased from 132.5 to 150.4 over the same period.

The day with the most geomagnetic activity was April 16, when the mid-latitude A index was 28, planetary A index was 43, and the high latitude college A index in Alaska was 57. These are high numbers!

Predicted solar flux for the near term is 135 and 130 on April 24-25, 125 on April 26 through May 1, 130 on May 2-5, 135 and 140 on May 6-7, 145 on May 8-9, 140 on May 10, 135 on May 11-16 and then a jump to 150 on May 17-18 before declining to 125 on May 23.

Predicted planetary A index is 8 and 12 on April 24-25, 8 on April 26-27, 10 on April 28, 8 on April 29 through May 2, 5 on May 3-5, 8 on May 6-8, 5 on May 9-11, then 8, 15, 20, 12, 8 and 12 on May 12-17, and 5 on May 18-19.

From April 16-22 there was one new sunspot region appearing each day, except for April 21 when there were two.

If you check the solar flux prediction archive at http://www.filedropper.com/filemanager/public.php?service=files&t=326dd41340bab1066cf91d13df36b8fd (click on “Download This File”) you can see how dramatically the prediction for the next few days changed recently. The forecasters pulled back on their estimates for higher solar flux.

F.K. Janda, OK1HH, sent his weekly geomagnetic prediction, and he sees quiet to active conditions April 24, active to disturbed April 25, quiet on April 26, quiet to active April 27, quiet to unsettled April 28, disturbed April 29, active to disturbed April 30 through May 1, quiet to active May 2, mostly quiet May 3-6, active to disturbed May 7-8, quiet to active May 9, mostly quiet May 10, quiet on May 11, active to disturbed May 12, disturbed May 13-14, quiet to active May 15, quiet to active May 16-18, and mostly quiet May 19-20.

OK1HH says that increases in solar wind are mostly unpredictable, but he expects increases on April 24, May 3-5, May 15-18, and May 20.

On Sunday, April 19 Jeff Hartley, N8II, of Shepherdstown, West Virginia wrote: “The high solar wind essentially closed 15 meters and up for a couple of days late last week except for South America. It is back to near normal now. I easily worked HS0ZCW on 12 meter SSB today at 1517Z and a few loud southern Europeans. Ten meters never really opened to Europe, but EA8DAZ was S9+20 db.’

On April 23, Jon Jones, N0JK, of Kansas wrote: “10 meters was good to the South Pacific the afternoon of April 23. FW5JJ was quite loud to the Midwest USA around 2200z on 28.029 MHz. I worked him with 50 W while parked from my mobile. K index was 0.

“Last Saturday, April 18, there was strong early season sporadic E on 6 meters. I worked W7GJ in Montana and KE8FD in Utah at about 2145z on 50 MHz via Es. K7TNT in Wyoming had a pipeline to CE2AWW for 2 hours. No copy on CE2AWW in Kansas. I had to work Saturday night shift, but saw many people spotted FK8CP via Es link to TEP that evening.”

I believe his ten meter mobile antenna is one of those shortened CB whips on the roof of his car.

For more information concerning radio propagation, see the ARRL Technical Information Service at http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of the numbers used in this bulletin, see http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere. An archive of past propagation bulletins is at http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.

Archives of the NOAA/USAF daily 45 day forecast for solar flux and planetary A index are at http://www.filedropper.com/filemanager/public.php?service=files&t=326dd41340bab1066cf91d13df36b8fd and http://www.filedropper.com/filemanager/public.php?service=files&t=be2a0a69fb6392907dc3d9a017dcace1 . Click on “Download this file” to download the archive and view in spreadsheet format.

Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.

Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.

Sunspot numbers for April 16 through 22 were 85, 93, 114, 142, 125, 153, and 134, with a mean of 120.9. 10.7 cm flux was 150.2, 149.6, 147.6, 151.7, 149.6, 153.8, and 150.3, with a mean of 150.4. Estimated planetary A indices were 43, 25, 13, 9, 10, 22, and 11, with a mean of 19. Estimated mid-latitude A indices were 28, 20, 10, 9, 9, 18, and 9, with a mean of 14.7.

via The K7RA Solar Update.

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Source:  http://www.arrl.org

Here’s the current solar update from papagation expert Tad Cook (K7RA).  Tad includes some interesting observations from his volunteer staff of propagation monitors.  Tad also lists some space weather and propagation links that should help you prepared for this weekend’s activities.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Log

Logbook of The World STATUS as of Friday, April 24

TAGS: arrl, Logbook, offline, problem, Thursday evening, World

04/24/2015

ARRL’s Logbook of The World has been experiencing intermittent outages.  The team is aware of the problem and asks that if you find you are unable to get into LoTW, try back at a later time.  We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience while we work through this.

 

via Log.

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Source:  http://www.arrl.org

Here we go again.  The Logbook of The World is experiencing problems and is now offline until repairs are made.  No cause was given by the ARRL for the loss of LoTW.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

House Committee Asks FCC for Documents Related to Proposed Enforcement Bureau Closures

House Committee Asks FCC for Documents Related to Proposed Enforcement Bureau Closures

TAGS: 20-year-old operating model, Amateur Service rules, ARRL CEO David, ARRL leadership, Committee members, Enforcement Bureau, FCC Chairman Tom, FCC Managing Director, federal communications commission, field agents, field offices, house committee, Rep Greg Walden

04/24/2015

The US House Committee on Energy and Commerce has given the Federal Communications Commission a May 7 deadline to produce documents related to FCC Enforcement Bureau proposals to close two-thirds of its field offices and eliminate nearly one-half of its staff of field agents. In an April 23 letter, Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) told FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler that his panel wants the Commission to provide all documents relating to the proposed closures.

“[Y]our proposal to shutter 16 of the Commission’s 24 field offices raises significant challenges and concerns,” Upton said. “The Commission has represented to Congress and the American people that it will ‘preserve the integrity of public safety communications infrastructure by taking action on 99 percent of complaints of interference to public safety communications within 1 day,’ yet your proposal to reduce the geographic footprint of the Commission appears to ignore the impact this might have on the Commission’s public interest goal.” Upton said the Commission has offered little information to support its proposals. “Indeed, our concerns have only been heightened by the Commission’s failure to provide all the information requested by the Committee,” he wrote.

The field office and personnel layoff proposals were outlined in a March 10 internal memorandum from Enforcement Bureau Chief Travis LeBlanc and FCC Managing Director Jon Wilkins to EB field staff. The memo, obtained by ARRL and others, cited the need to take “a fresh look” at the Bureau’s 20-year-old operating model in light of technology changes and tighter budgets.

During March hearings of the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology — chaired by Rep Greg Walden, W7EQI (R-OR) — on the FCC’s FY 2015 budget request, Committee members sought more information from Wilkins and Wheeler on the basis of the proposals to close field offices. Upton said that his Committee has, to date, received just the two-page March 10 memorandum and a 35-page PowerPoint presentation that purports to outline the consultants’ report.

ARRL leadership met with Enforcement Bureau staff and with Capitol Hill lawmakers in March to express its own concerns with the proposals in light of seemingly lax enforcement of the Amateur Service rules. ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, also addressed the FCC’s field office closure proposals in his “It Seems to Us” editorial in the May 2015 issue of QST. “Given everything that’s on [the Enforcement Bureau’s] plate — of which Amateur Radio is just a small part — reducing the number of field agents from 63 to 33 and the number of field offices from 24 to 8 hardly sounds like progress,” Sumner wrote.

In his April 23 letter, Upton told Wheeler that his panel wants the Commission to provide all documents, “including all drafts, memos, e-mails, analyses, PowerPoint slides, interim reports, and the final report,” produced by outside consultants and related to the proposed field office closures. The committee also wants all documents “including all internal communications and internal analyses” related to the Enforcement Bureau’s and Office of Managing Director’s joint recommendation to the full Commission to close the field offices.

 

via House Committee Asks FCC for Documents Related to Proposed Enforcement Bureau Closures.

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Source:  http://www.arrl.org

Congress wants some answers from the FCC.  The U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce has given the FCC until 07 May 2015 to explain why it wants to shut down approximately 2/3 of its field offices and remove almost half of its field agents involved rules enforcement.  Even the ARRL has weighed in on the heavily criticized proposals, saying enforcement should be maintained and not reduced.  Please let your congress person know how you feel about this issue.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

Spratlys DX0P DXpedition Participant Evacuated for Medical Emergency

Spratlys DX0P DXpedition Participant Evacuated for Medical Emergency

TAGS: medical emergency, Spratly Islands, Wanted DXCC List

04/23/2015

[Updated 2015-04-23 1455 UTC] One of the participants in the just-ended DX0P DXpedition to the disputed Spratly Islands was airlifted from Pag Asa Island after suffering a medical emergency. Chito Pastor, WW6CP, became ill just as the DXpedition was starting to wrap up on April 20.

“The Medevac just arrived half an hour ago!” DXpedition leader Leo Almazan, WA6LOS, told ARRL early on April 23. “Chito is on his way to the hospital!”

Almazan said that he and four other team members were able to return to the Philippines on another flight. The remaining team members will remain on Pag Asa until a Philippine Navy Nomad aircraft takes them off the island on April 24. “From what I heard, they were all busy snorkeling all day,” said Almazan, who is now at his Angeles City home in the Philippines. He said he plans to fly stateside next month for Dayton Hamvention®.

According to Amateur Radio DX.com, an Adventist Medical Aviators Services aircraft that picked up Pastor landed safely in Puerto Princesa.

Members of the Mabuhay DX Group went to Pag Asa Island earlier this month and operated for about 5 days, logging some 5000 contacts. All of the DXpedition participants have roots in or reside in the Philippines.

A Philippines TV news account posted on the InterAksyon.com website on April 22 reported that Pastor developed kidney problems from drinking from the highly saline water supply on Pag Asa after the DXpedition’s drinking water supply ran short. According to the InterAksyon report, a Chinese naval vessel had “harassed a Philippine Air Force patrol flight in the Spratlys” by firing an illumination round on April 21. Almazan told ARRL that the Philippines military later backed away from that account, but the incident caused the postponement of future flights to Pag Asa Island, including the Philippine Navy flight that was to evacuate Pastor.

The military aircraft set to evacuate Pastor later developed mechanical problems, causing further delay, and the Adventist flight was subsequently cleared to make the medical mission on April 23.

The InterAksyon report noted that China “has embarked on an aggressive reclamation and construction spree” in the Spratlys, which are claimed in whole or in part by China, the Philippines, Vietnam, and other countries. The Philippines National Telecommunications Commission issued the DX0P license.

Spratly Island is number 75 on the ClubLog DXCC Most Wanted List. Almazan headed a nine-member team to Pag Asa Island.

“I can write a novel about this DXpedition!” Almazan told ARRL.

 

via Spratlys DX0P DXpedition Participant Evacuated for Medical Emergency.

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Source:  http://www.arrl.org

The recently-ended Philippine DXpedition to Pag Asa Island in the Spratly Islands had a high moment of drama when operator Clito Pastor (WW6CD) suffered a medical emegency from drinking too much salt water on the island.  The air evacuation from the disputed island was successful, with the remaining DXpedition members awaiting evacuation by a Philippine naval aircraft on Friday, 24 April 2015.  The DXpedition was held in waters disputed by China, Malaysia, Vietnam, and other Southeast Asian nations.  A Chinese naval vessal allegedly harrassed a Philippine military aircraft checking the condition of the DXpedition party on the island.  Over the past 30 years, DXpeditions to this disputed area have been shot at and harrassed by contending military forces in the area.  In the early 1980s, a German DXpedition to the area was fired upon, resulting in the death of a German radio operator.  Sometimes DXpeditions can be very dangerous.  I hope you will cherish the QSL card received from this DXpedition.  Someone nearly died giving you that contact.

For the latest Amateur Radio News and Events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  Also, you can visit my Amateur Radio news site at http://www.myalltop.com/KH6JRM.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM.

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.

The ARRL Letter, April 23, 2015

The ARRL Letter, April 23, 2015.

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Please click link to read the complete transcript.

Source:  http://www.forums.qrz.com

Here’s the latest edition of The ARRL Letter, dated 23 April 2015.  Articles include:

Preparations for WRC-15.

Chilean hams activate emergency nets for volcanic eruption.

ARRL “Ham Aid” reaches Micronesia in the wake of a devastating tropical cyclone.

Spratlys DXOP participant evacuated for medical emergency.

The K7RA Solar report.

Just ahead in Radiosport.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently.

You can follow our blog community with a free e-mail subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Google shakeup and amateur radio clubs | Southgate Amateur Radio News

This page is brought to by The Southgate Amateur Radio Club and AMSAT-UK.

 

 

Page last updated on: Tuesday, April 21, 2015.

 

 

Google shakeup and amateur radio clubs.

April 21, 2015, saw a significant change taking place under the hood of the Google search engine. The results that you see will change to favour sites that are optimised for use on mobile devices

Essex Ham take a quick look at how these changes may impact amateur radio websites, and how without action, some of our amateur radio club websites may be even harder to find after this change by Google.

Read the article at

http://www.essexham.co.uk/news/google-and-amateur-radio-clubs.html

Essex Ham – Amateur Radio Getting Started Guides

http://www.essexham.co.uk/getstarted

 

via Google shakeup and amateur radio clubs | Southgate Amateur Radio News.

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Source:  The Southgate Amateur Radio Club.

Google has implemented a new search engine policy which favors websites and blogs that are  opimized for mobile devices such as smart phones.  Essex Ham examines how the search policy will impact Amateur Radio websites.

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebar.  These news feeds are updated frequently. You can also check my Amateur Radio news site at http://www.myalltop.com/KH6JRM.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

KH6JRM’s Amateur Radio Blog.